Plat maps Endicott, Almota, Revere, Pandora, and Palisades, (1910)<br>Plat book of Whitman County, Washington compiled and published from actual surveys and the County records by Anderson Map Company

Files

http://content.wsulibs.wsu.edu/maps/image/104.jpg

Title

Plat maps Endicott, Almota, Revere, Pandora, and Palisades, (1910)<br>Plat book of Whitman County, Washington compiled and published from actual surveys and the County records by Anderson Map Company

Subject

Endicott (Wash.)--Maps<br>Almota (Wash.)--Maps<br> Revere (Wash.)--Maps<br>Pandora (Wash.)--Maps<br>Palisades (Wash.)--Maps<br>Whitman County (Wash.) -- Maps<br>

Description

1 map: col., 41 x 34 cm.<br>Plat maps from the Whitman County cities of Endicott, Almota, Revere, Pandora, and Palisades. <br>Endicott and Almota scale 400'=1"<br>Revere, Pandora, and Palisades scale 800'=1"<br>Of the five platted towns, only Endicott and Almota grew to any significance. In 1909 the Milwaukee Road, a part of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad, held an auction in Spokane for land at five locations along their tracks. Among them was Pandora. It lay eight miles north of Oakesdale, in the Pine Creek Valley.<br>The C.M.S.P RR also named the town of Revere--located 30 miles northwest of Colfax--after Paul Revere. Some people already lived in the area prior to the coming of the C.M.P.S., and even a school was established in 1910.<br>Much less information is available, however, for the C.M.P.S. flag stop known as Palisade. It lay on the northeast side of Rock Lake and so at times was even called "Rock Lake Station" instead.<br>Endicott was founded in 1882 by the Oregon Land and Improvement Co., and was named for William Endicott, Jr., a shareholder in the company. Prior to this name settlers from the confederacy called the area "Rebel Flat". A number of German-Russians settled there during the years 1882-1907, buying land communally and splitting it among them.<br>Almota, on the north side of the Snake River almost 40 miles above Clarkston, was early on used by Nez Perce Indians as a fishing site. "Allamotin", "Almotine", and even "Alto Motin" have been given as Nez Perce names for the area, meaning "torchlight" or "moonlight fishing". Almota, soon became the trading/shipping center for all of Inland Empire, but lost some of its business when rail lines arrived in Colfax in 1883. The Oregon, Washington and Idaho Railroad and the Snake River Valley Railroad would not arrive in Almota until 1907. Today it is located near Lake Bryan, the reservoir formed from the construction of the Little Goose Dam.

Creator

Anderson Map Company.

Source

Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections, WSU Libraries

Publisher

Seattle, Wash. : Anderson Map Company

Date

1910

Contributor

Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections

Rights

Contact Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections, for copyright information 509 335-6691

Relation

Is part of Plat Book of Whitman County Washington Compiled and Published from actual Surveys and the County Records by Anderson Map Company Seattle, Wash 1910

Format

image/jpeg

Language

English

Type

Maps<br>Plats

Identifier

WSU 99

Coverage

United States--Washington (State)--Whitman County--Endicott
United States--Washington (State)--Whitman County--Almota
United States--Washington (State)--Whitman County--Revere
United States--Washington (State)--Whitman County--Pandora
United States--Washington (State)--Whitman County--Palisades

Citation

Anderson Map Company., “Plat maps Endicott, Almota, Revere, Pandora, and Palisades, (1910)<br>Plat book of Whitman County, Washington compiled and published from actual surveys and the County records by Anderson Map Company,” Digital Exhibits, accessed April 20, 2024, http://digitalexhibits.libraries.wsu.edu/items/show/1649.